Hello, my name is Liudmila. I was born in Lithuania, have family roots in Russia, but now I live in Norway:) I can't tell anything astonishing about myself... I'm not registered in the Guinness Book of Records, haven't invented the bicycle and wasn't elected as a president :D I'm an ordirary person with simple hobbies - love travelling, reading books, meeting my friends, I just love life as it is, with all advantages and disadvantages. I just have an interesting hobby - I collect bookmarks :) I'm a passionate bookmark collector and hope to find more collectors, exchange bookmarks with them, show my collection to others and have a look at other collections :) You can contact me, if you're interested in bookmark exchange :) Hope to find friends from all over the world :)

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Dragon - the symbol of Wales

The bookmark from Abergavenny.

Abergavenny (Welsh: Y Fenni), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a market town in Monmouthshire, Wales. It is located 15 miles (24 km) west of Monmouth on the A40 and A465 roads, 6 miles (10 km) from the English border. Originally the site of a Roman fort, Gobannium, it became a medieval walled town within the Welsh Marches. The town contains the remains of a medieval stone castle built soon after the Norman conquest of Wales.
Abergavenny is promoted as the "Gateway to Wales". Situated at the confluence of a tributary stream, the Gavenny, and the River Usk, it is almost surrounded by two mountains – the Blorenge (559 m) and the Sugar Loaf (596 m) – and five hills: Ysgyryd Fawr (The Skirrid), Ysgyryd Fach (Skirrid Fach), Deri, Rholben and Mynydd Llanwenarth, known locally as "Llanwenarth Breast". It provides access to the nearby Black Mountains and the Brecon Beacons National Park. The Offa's Dyke Path is close by and the Marches Way, the Beacons Way and Usk Valley Walk all pass through the town. More history...

The Welsh Dragon – appears on the national flag of Wales. The flag is also called Y Ddraig Goch. The oldest recorded use of the dragon to symbolise Wales is in the Historia Brittonum, written around AD 829, but it is popularly supposed to have been the battle standard of King Arthur and other ancient Celtic leaders. Its association with these leaders along with other evidence from archaeology, literature, and documentary history lead many to suppose that it evolved from an earlier Romano-British national symbol.During the reigns of the Tudor monarchs, the red dragon was used as a supporter in the English Crown's coat of arms (one of two supporters, along with the traditional English lion).The red dragon is often seen as symbolising all things Welsh, and is used by many public and private institutions. More...

Thank you very much, Jurate :)

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